Talks by Jeongwan Haah

Time-efficient learning of quantum Hamiltonians from high-temperature Gibbs states

Jeongwan Haah Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Physics

We study the problem of learning a Hamiltonian given copies of its Gibbs state at a known inverse temperature. Anshu et al. recently studied the sample complexity (number of copies of the Gibbs state needed) of this problem for geometrically local Hamiltonians. In the high-temperature regime, their algorithm has sample complexity polynomial in the system size, temperature, and accuracy. Their algorithm can also be implemented with polynomial, but suboptimal, time complexity.

Long-range entangled many-body states

Jeongwan Haah Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Physics

A quantum entanglement is a special kind of correlation; it may yield a strong correlation that is not possible in a classical ensemble, or hide the correlation from all local observables. Especially important is the entanglement that arises from local interactions for its implications in many-body physics and future’s quantum technologies.

An invariant of topologically ordered states under local unitary transformations

Jeongwan Haah Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Physics
For an anyon model in two spatial dimensions described by a modular tensor category, the topological S-matrix encodes the mutual braiding statistics, the quantum dimensions, and the fusion rules of anyons. It is nontrivial whether one can compute the topological S-matrix from a single ground state wave function. In this talk, I will show that, for a class of Hamiltonians, it is possible to define the S-matrix regardless of the degeneracy of the ground state. The definition manifests invariance of the S-matrix under local unitary transformations (quantum circuits).

Demonstration of Self-correcting Quantum Memory in Three Dimensions

Jeongwan Haah Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Department of Physics
Based on the joint work with Sergey Bravyi, IBM Watson.   We show that any topologically ordered local stabilizer model of spins in three dimensional lattices that lacks string logical operators can be used as a reliable quantum memory against thermal noise. It is shown that any local process creating a topologically charged particle separated from other particles by distance $R$, must cross an energy barrier of height $c \log R$. This property makes the model glassy.