Abstract

With the rapid development of programmable quantum simulators, the quantum states can be controlled with unprecedented precision. Thus, it opens a new opportunity to explore the strongly correlated phase of matter with new quantum technology platforms. In quantum simulators, one can engineer interactions between the microscopic degree of freedom and create exotic phases of matter that presumably are beyond the reach of natural materials. Moreover, quantum states can be directly measured instead of probing physical properties indirectly via optical and electrical responses of material as done in traditional condensed matter. Therefore, it is pressing to develop new approaches to efficiently prepare and characterize desired quantum states in the novel quantum technology platforms.

In this talk, I will introduce our recent works on the characterization of the topological invariants from a ground state wave function of the topological order phase and the implementation in noisy intermediate quantum devices. First, using topological field theory and tensor network simulations, we demonstrate how to extract the many-body Chern number (MBCN) given a bulk of a fractional quantum Hall wave function [1]. We then propose an ancilla-free experimental scheme for measuring the MBCN without requiring any knowledge of the Hamiltonian. Specifically, we use the statistical correlations of randomized measurements to infer the MBCN of a wave function [2]. Finally, I will present an unbiased numerical optimization scheme to systematically find the Wilson loop operators given a ground state wave function of a gapped, translationally invariant Hamiltonian on a disk. We then show how these Wilson loop operators can be cut and glued through further optimization to give operators that can create, move, and annihilate anyon excitations. We then use these operators to determine the braiding statistics and topological twists of the anyons, yielding a way to fully characterize topological order from the bulk of a ground state wave function [3]. 

[1] H. Dehghani, Z.P. Cian, M. Hafezi, and M. Barkeshl, Phys. Rev. B 103, 075102
[2] Z.P. Cian, H. Dehghani, A. Elben, B. Vermersch, G. Zhu, M. Barkeshli, P. Zoller, and M. Hafezi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 126, 050501
[3] Z.P. Cian, M. Hafezi, and M. Barkeshl, Manuscript in preparation.

Details

Talk Number PIRSA:21120013
Speaker Profile Ze-Pei Cian