Next-Generation Implications of Open Access

Paul Ginsparg Cornell University
True open access to scientific publications not only gives readers the possibility to read articles without paying subscription, but also makes the material available for automated ingestion and harvesting by 3rd parties. Once articles and associated data become universally treatable as computable objects, openly available to 3rd party aggregators and value-added services, what new services can we expect, and how will they change the way that researchers interact with their scholarly communications infrastructure?

Flavon Inflation

Stefan Antusch Max-Planck Gesellschaft
A new class of particle physics models of inflation is presented which is based on the phase transition associated with the spontaneous breaking of family symmetry responsible for the generation of the effective quark and lepton Yukawa couplings. We show

Moduli stabilization and flavor structure in 5D SUGRA with multi moduli

Moduli stabilization, SUSY breaking and flavor structure are discussed in 5D gauged supergravity models with two vector-multiplet moduli fields. One modulus field makes the fermion mass hierarchy while the other is relevant to the SUSY breaking mediation. We analyse the potential for the moduli from the viewpoint of the 4D effective theory to obtain the stabilized values of the moduli and their F-terms.

Gravitational Radiation from Preheating

John Giblin Kenyon College
Parametric resonance, also known as preheating, is a plausible mechanism for bringing about the transition between the inflationary phase and a hot, radiation dominated universe. This epoch results in the rapid production of heavy particles far from thermal equilibrium and has the potential to source a significant stochastic background of gravitational radiation. Here, I present a numerical algorithm for computing the contemporary power spectrum of gravity waves generated in this post-inflationary phase transition for a large class of scalar-field driven inflationary models.

Interaction and Evolution in Classical and Quantum Physics, and Indefinite Causal Structure

Erik Curiel Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitiät München (LMU)
In classical mechanics, the representations of dynamical evolutions of a system and those of interactions the system can have with its environment are different vector fields on the space of states: evolutions and interactions are conceptually, physically and mathematically different in classical physics, and those differences arise from the generic structure of the very dynamics of classical systems ("Newton's Second Law"). Correlatively, there is a clean separation of the system's degrees of freedom from those of its environment, in a sense one can make precise.

Hierarchy of Theories with Indefinite Causal Structures: A Second Look at the Causaloid Framework

Nitica Sakharwade Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
"The Causaloid framework [1] is useful to study Theories with Indefinite Causality; since Quantum Gravity is expected to marry the radical aspects of General Relativity (dynamic causality) and Quantum Theory (probabilistic-ness). To operationally study physical theories one finds the minimum set of quantities required to perform any calculation through physical compression.

Time Symmetry in Decoherence and Stable Facts

Anirban Ganguly Aix-Marseille University
It has been previously discussed how events (interactions) in quantum mechanics are time-symmetric and an arrow of time is only due to the arrow of inference in the paper “Quantum information and the arrow of time”, arXiv:2010.05734 by Andrea Di Biagio, Pietro Dona, and Carlo Rovelli. In the relational interpretation of Quantum Mechanics, these interactions are relative facts. Stable facts result from relative facts through the process of decoherence as shown in the paper "Di Biagio, A., Rovelli, C., Foundations of Physics 51, 30 (2021)".

Arrows of time and locally mediated toy-models of entanglement

"Making progress in quantum gravity requires resolving possible tensions between quantum mechanics and relativity.  One such tension is revealed by Bell's Theorem, but this relies on relativistic Local Causality, not merely the time-reversal symmetric aspects of relativity.  Specifically, it depends on an arrow-of-time condition, taken for granted by Bell, which we call No Future-Input Dependence.  One may replace this condition by the weaker Signal Causality arrow-of-time requirement -- only the latter is necessary, both for empirical viability and in order to avoid paradoxical causal loops.